Getting Organized with Google Drive

In my last post I shared with you my process for writing long-term plans and I shared my scope & sequence for Algebra I.  (Click here to read that post if you missed it!)  Today I thought I would share my long term plans for my other classes (7th grade math, 7th grade Pre-Algebra, and 8th grade math),  as well as my next step in the planning process – setting up Google Drive.

Click below to download my scopes & sequences.  (They are editable word docs).

7th Grade Scope & Sequence

Pre-Algebra Scope & Sequence

8th Grade Scope & Sequence

As I said in my last post, my next step after writing my plans was to set up Pinterest boards for each unit in each class to store any ideas I find online that I don’t want to forget.  (So far I have boards set up for each of my Algebra and Pre-Algebra units, which you can check out here).

The next thing I am doing is setting up folders in my Google Drive.

google drive organization

I am terrible with physical file cabinets – mine is literally just filled with junk and stacks of extra copies, etc. and is not organized in the least.  That’s why using Google Drive works so well for me!   Google Drive has been great in helping me be more organized but in the past I haven’t used it to its full potential.  I truly believe that folders and sub-folders are the key to making the most of this awesome organizational tool!

For the coming school year I started by making a main folder for each class I teach:

google drive

Within each folder I put general class information and am in the process of creating sub folders for each unit.  (So far I only have the first two units done).

class gdrive

I am putting any and all resources I might need for the unit in each unit sub-folder, so to keep them manageable,  I plan to put sub folders within each unit folder for each lesson.  So in my Unit 1 Algebra Basics folder I will have a folder for Adding & Subtracting Rational Numbers, Multiplying & Dividing Rational Numbers, Writing & Evaluating Expressions, etc…  One folder for each lesson within the unit.  Within each of those folders I will put the classwork, task cards, worksheets, homework assignments, etc. that I am using for that lesson.  Then everything is in one place and easy to find.

Seems like such a simple idea (and it is!) but for some reason I never thought to actually organize my Drive the same way I organize my lesson plans.

While my plan is to try to fill my unit folders as much as possible ahead of time, I will also add to them throughout the year as I determine what resources I am using for each lesson.  The nice thing about that is that once it’s done I will have it ready to go for future years, as well!

The other nice thing about using Google Drive as opposed to a physical filing cabinet is that I can use the search bar at the top to type in what I am looking for in case I can’t remember the name of it or what folder I put it in.  It makes it soo easy to find what I am looking for, which is exactly what someone who is not naturally organized (like me!) needs!!

Do you have any tips for organizing school materials or using Google Drive?  Feel free to share by leaving a comment!  (I believe I finally got the comments working again after they had been broken for months!  yay!)

Thanks for reading,

Christina

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Long-Term Planning (Algebra I)

I personally believe that it’s a good idea to start thinking ahead to the next school year around this time of year.  I admit that I don’t normally start planning until August but this year I am getting a head start because I believe it will allow me to be much less stressed come September.

If you are looking to start planning out your year and have no idea where to start (which was me a couple of weeks ago before I just jumped in), I’ll share my process for long-term planning.  The first class I worked on was Algebra I, so I’ll share that one today.

long term planning blog pic

Step 1:  Look over everything you need to teach and break it up into units.  I try to use as few units as possible while keeping each one a manageable size.  For Algebra I, I came up with 11 different units.

Step 2:  Determine the order in which you want to teach those units.  This can be tricky because you need to make sure that students have all the prerequisite skills for each unit and you want the year to have a good flow.

Step 3:  Determine all of the different lessons that will be included in each unit and the order in which you want to teach them.  This is the most time-consuming part, in my opinion, but it will save you a lot of time throughout the year if you get the whole year figured out before school starts.

Step 4:  Determine an approximate length of time it will take you to teach each unit.  Since my Algebra I class is an advanced class for 8th graders, I am able to move fairly quickly.  Therefore, I normally plan to teach a lesson a day.  I plan on 2 days for topics that I know students will find challenging.  I add 3 days to the end of a unit since I typically spend 2 days on review and 1 day for the unit test.

Here is my long-term plan (scope & sequence/curriculum map) for Algebra I.  Feel free to download it and edit/adjust it to meet your needs.

algebra scope

The next thing I did is something I should have done long ago…I organized my Pinterest boards.  I love getting ideas on Pinterest but I previously put all the great teaching ideas I found on my “Math Teaching Ideas” board…and then forgot all about them.  So I setup a separate Pinterest board for each Algebra I unit and moved pins from my (useless) “math teaching ideas” board onto the appropriate boards.  Now when I see great Algebra ideas on pinterest or read about them on blogs, I pin them onto the board that corresponds to that unit.  I forsee this being very valuable when I am actually writing my lesson plans throughout the years – I can glance through the unit Pinterest board to remind myself of all the great ideas I want to implement.

Click the picture below if you want to check out my Algebra I Units Pinterest Boards:

pinterest

Step 5: (I won’t get around to this step until closer to the start of the year when I have my schedule…)  Translate your estimated time frames into calendar dates.  I have a blank school year calendar that is weekdays only.  I write in school holidays/half days, etc. and then write in my approximate start dates for each unit based off the estimated time frames I came up with.  I then adjust as necessary around long breaks like Christmas and Easter.

You can download my calendar FREE from my TpT store by clicking the image below:

calendar pic1

There you have it…my process for writing  long-term plans.  I have had years when I haven’t done detailed year-long plans and years when I have done them and I can say from experience that it really does pay off to do them because it helps you have a smoother, less stressful school year when you have a map to follow.

Do you have any tips or tricks for planning out a school year?  Please feel free to leave a comment sharing your ideas!

Thanks for reading,

Christina

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